Teaching and Learning

How Can You Save Your Students Money, Respect the Environment and Build Accessible Communities?

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Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on February 5, 2020 - 11:06am

Join Us to Learn How!

You are invited to join members of the Teaching and Learning Leadership Council as they present their investigative work around Open Learning. This session will take the form of a world cafe where participants will cycle through three table sessions on topics including Open Resources and Open Assessment, Converting Documents to E-books and Using online Tools to facilitate communication in an Open Environment. 

Preparing For The Under-prepared Studio

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Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on January 31, 2020 - 4:04pm

A studio session is a meeting of 6-8 faculty in which everyone commits to learning and sharing their insights about student preparedness and the ways in which teaching and learning can address this area of our teaching practice.

During the highly-participatory 90-minute session, participants will identify challenges related to student preparedness, pose questions to deepen collective understanding, and offer solutions for all to draw from.

Teaching with Student Groups: A Studio

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Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on January 31, 2020 - 2:31pm

A Studio is a meeting of 6-8 faculty in a room where everyone commits to learning and sharing their insights or questions about the topic under study. During this session participants will identify specific challenges related to the use of student collaboration, pose inquiries to deepen collective understanding, and offer solutions for all to draw from.

Group Work that Works

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Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on January 31, 2020 - 2:03pm

Whether you use informal discussion groups, project groups, permanent groups, or just think-pair-share during a lecture, you may find this session relevant.

To group or not to group. Collaborative and cooperative learning activities have great promise for helping students learn, but it’s not 100% guaranteed they will be successful. Sometimes students thrive in a collaborative environment; and sometimes they crash and burn.

Teaching with Student Groups: A Studio

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on January 31, 2020 - 2:01pm

A Studio is a meeting of 6-8 faculty in a room where everyone commits to learning and sharing their insights or questions about the topic under study. During this session participants will identify specific challenges related to the use of student collaboration, pose inquiries to deepen collective understanding, and offer solutions for all to draw from.

Group Work that Works

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on January 31, 2020 - 1:32pm

Whether you use informal discussion groups, project groups, permanent groups, or just think-pair-share during a lecture, you may find this session relevant.

To group or not to group. Collaborative and cooperative learning activities have great promise for helping students learn, but it’s not 100% guaranteed they will be successful. Sometimes students thrive in a collaborative environment; and sometimes they crash and burn.

Difficult Conversations in the Classroom Studio

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Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on December 11, 2019 - 1:54pm

How do you respond to an ‘explosion’ in the classroom? Are there ways to mend the classroom community when someone has said something offensive in class? How can you prepare for unexpectedly difficult conversations—especially if you teach controversial topics? These are a few of the questions we will explore in a “studio” format.

Difficult Conversations in the Classroom

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on December 11, 2019 - 1:52pm

We’ve all had (or worried about) that experience where the in-class discussion is lively and productive, until a student says something that upsets everyone. How to respond on the spot? How to mend the community that is your classroom after someone has said something ‘out of line’? Or, if the case allows, how to make this a “teachable moment”?

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