Teaching and Learning

Equity and Equality: Working with Students with Disabilities

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on December 17, 2018 - 11:40am

 

Equity and equality—is there a difference in the classroom?

Join Disability Access Services and CIEL for a collaborative, educational session about ensuring that students with disabilities have the same chances to succeed as those without disabilities. We will discuss protocol and ways to address issues of attendance and  surprising behavior.

Through discussion of case studies, you will come away with a deeper understanding of what your role is—and what it isn’t—as an instructor teaching students with diverse learning needs.

Why Does This Always Happen? Reflecting on Conundrums in the Classroom

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on December 17, 2018 - 10:07am

Have you experienced a perplexing puzzle in a course you teach regularly? Students struggle with one particular concept, no matter what you try. Or there’s a bi-modal performance; some students excel, others remain confused until the end of the term. Whatever your conundrum, investigating what is actually causing it can help you to find novel solutions for the next time you teach the course.

Better Student Preparation for Active Participation

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on December 17, 2018 - 9:42am

 

We often hear ‘How can I engage my students in class if they don’t come prepared?’ ‘Why don’t students read?’ and ‘What’s it going to take to get them to do the work ahead of time?’

This discussion will answer each of these questions by focusing on what ‘being prepared’ looks like in your class and examining the options you have for changing students’ behavior and sense of responsibility for learning.

The UnMarking Studio: Balancing Student Needs with Faculty Realities

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on November 14, 2018 - 11:08am

How much marking is optimal? How many assignments are best for student learning? Could we mark and grade less yet still be respectable? Or more surprising yet: Could less marking and fewer grades be causally related to more student learning? These are just a few of the inquiries you are invited to explore with your VIU colleagues in a “studio” format.

The UnMarking Studio: Balancing Student Needs with Faculty Realities

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on November 14, 2018 - 11:06am

How much marking is optimal? How many assignments are best for student learning? Could we mark and grade less yet still be respectable? Or more surprising yet: Could less marking and fewer grades be causally related to more student learning? These are just a few of the inquiries you are invited to explore with your VIU colleagues in a “studio” format.

The UnMarking Studio: Balancing Student Needs with Faculty Realities

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on September 13, 2018 - 4:12pm

How much marking is optimal? How many assignments are best for student learning? Could we mark and grade less yet still be respectable? Or more surprising yet: Could less marking and fewer grades be causally related to more student learning? These are just a few of the inquiries you are invited to explore with your VIU colleagues in a “studio” format.

The UnMarking Studio: Balancing Student Needs with Faculty Realities

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on September 13, 2018 - 4:03pm

How much marking is optimal? How many assignments are best for student learning? Could we mark and grade less yet still be respectable? Or more surprising yet: Could less marking and fewer grades be causally related to more student learning? These are just a few of the inquiries you are invited to explore with your VIU colleagues in a “studio” format.

The UnMarking Studio: Balancing Student Needs with Faculty Realities

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on September 13, 2018 - 3:59pm

How much marking is optimal? How many assignments are best for student learning? Could we mark and grade less yet still be respectable? Or more surprising yet: Could less marking and fewer grades be causally related to more student learning? These are just a few of the inquiries you are invited to explore with your VIU colleagues in a “studio” format.

The Tao of Marking: Finding Joy by “De-Complicating” Grades and Feedback

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on September 13, 2018 - 3:47pm

We care deeply about our students—that’s why we teach. But caring for our students can also lead us to adopt practices that are non-sustainable and maybe even joyless, such as long weekends bent over papers, grading sessions that extend into the holidays, or hours crunching numbers to produce final course marks. If these behaviours are the result of our caring, we have to begin questioning “why?” Why has it been possible for our caring to displace our pleasure and satisfaction as educators. Where did the fun go, and what can we do to get it back?

COWICHAN: The Tao of Marking: Finding Joy by “De-Complicating” Grades and Feedback

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on September 13, 2018 - 3:09pm

We care deeply about our students—that’s why we teach. But caring for our students can also lead us to adopt practices that are non-sustainable and maybe even joyless, such as long weekends bent over papers, grading sessions that extend into the holidays, or hours crunching numbers to produce final course marks. If these behaviours are the result of our caring, we have to begin questioning “why?” Why has it been possible for our caring to displace our pleasure and satisfaction as educators. Where did the fun go, and what can we do to get it back?

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