Unmarking/Assessment

Welcome to the Un-Marking Movement; or, How to Find Joy by “De-complicating” Grades and Feedback

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on December 15, 2020 - 3:33pm

jWe care deeply about our students—that’s why we teach. But caring a lot can also lead us to adopt practices (usually by accident) that are counter-productive, non-sustainable and even joyless: i.e. those end-of-semester marking marathons that extend into the holidays.

If pleasure-less practices are the unintentional result of our caring, we have to begin asking: Where did the fun go, and what can we do to get it back!!?

Welcome to the Un-Marking Movement; or, How to Find Joy by “De-complicating” Grades and Feedback

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on December 15, 2020 - 3:17pm

We care deeply about our students—that’s why we teach. But caring a lot can also lead us to adopt practices (usually by accident) that are counter-productive, non-sustainable and even joyless: i.e. those end-of-semester marking marathons that extend into the holidays.

If pleasure-less practices are the unintentional result of our caring, we have to begin asking: Where did the fun go, and what can we do to get it back!!?

Marking and Grading for Online Learning: A studio for VIU Faculty

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on October 1, 2020 - 2:01pm

How much work do you require students to do? How much grading and marking does that leave YOU to do? This event asks participants to look at assessment practices by VIU faculty participants, and collaborate in finding ways to improve or tweak for greater efficiency and effectiveness. A “studio” is a small group discussion, hosted by CIEL, in which faculty bring their own cases to share and co-analyze. Come with a question, an issue, or a problem. We’ll put it before the group and generate as many ideas as we can.

The UnMarking Studio: Balancing Student Needs with Faculty Realities

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on January 31, 2019 - 11:51am

How much marking is optimal? How many assignments are best for student learning? Could we mark and grade less yet still be respectable? Or more surprising yet: Could less marking and fewer grades be causally related to more student learning? These are just a few of the inquiries you are invited to explore with your VIU colleagues in a “studio” format.

The UnMarking Studio: Balancing Student Needs with Faculty Realities

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on December 19, 2018 - 4:03pm

How much marking is optimal? How many assignments are best for student learning? Could we mark and grade less yet still be respectable? Or more surprising yet: Could less marking and fewer grades be causally related to more student learning? These are just a few of the inquiries you are invited to explore with your VIU colleagues in a “studio” format.

The UnMarking Studio: Balancing Student Needs with Faculty Realities

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on December 19, 2018 - 2:24pm

How much marking is optimal? How many assignments are best for student learning? Could we mark and grade less yet still be respectable? Or more surprising yet: Could less marking and fewer grades be causally related to more student learning? These are just a few of the inquiries you are invited to explore with your VIU colleagues in a “studio” format.

The UnMarking Studio: Balancing Student Needs with Faculty Realities

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on December 17, 2018 - 9:50am

 

How much marking is optimal? How many assignments are best for student learning? Could we mark and grade less yet still be respectable? Or more surprising yet: Could less marking and fewer grades be causally related to more student learning? These are just a few of the inquiries you are invited to explore with your VIU colleagues in a “studio” format.

The Tao of Marking: Finding Joy by “De-Complicating” Grades and Feedback

Stephanie Didsbury's picture
Submitted by Stephanie Didsbury on December 17, 2018 - 9:22am

We care deeply about our students—that’s why we teach. But caring for our students can also lead us to adopt practices that are non-sustainable and maybe even joyless, such as long weekends bent over papers, grading sessions that extend into the holidays, or hours crunching numbers to produce final course marks. If these behaviours are the result of our caring, we have to begin questioning “why?” Why has it been possible for our caring to displace our pleasure and satisfaction as educators. Where did the fun go, and what can we do to get it back?